More quotes from William Blackstone

No outward doors of a man’s house can in general be broken open to execute any civil process; though in criminal cases the public safety supersedes the private.

 

The law, which restrains a man from doing mischief to his fellow citizens, though it diminishes the natural, increases the civil liberty of mankind.”

 

The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state: but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published.  Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public: to forbid this, is to destroy the freedom of the press: but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity.”

Also in this issue:

Auditors at it again

Marital strife and the workplace

Good, old-fashioned insider trading

Hurry up and do not wait

Uber confusion

Does freedom of speech include the right to shup up?